Alexandra Paxton

Degree Ph.D., Cognitive and Information Sciences, University of California, Merced (2015)
Research Interests • Communication and social interaction as a complex dynamical system (including movement, language, attention, and emotion)

• Data-rich and dynamics-focused research methods and analyses

• Naturally occurring datasets and “big data” for psychological theory-building

• Ethics of human-derived data

Research Synopsis My work focuses on improving our understanding of communication and interaction with a data-rich and complex-systems approach. I’m particularly interested in how context changes behavior.
Courses PSYC 1100
Recent Publications Duran, N., Paxton, A., & Fusaroli, R. (in press). ALIGN: Analyzing Linguistic Interactions with Generalizable techniques. Psychological Methods.

 

Paxton, A., & Tullett, A. (in press). Open science in data-intensive psychology and cognitive science. Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences.

 

Smith, G. K., Mills, C., Paxton, A., & Christoff, K. (2018). Mind wandering rates fluctuate across the day: Evidence from an experience sampling study. Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications, 3, 54. doi: 10.1186/s41235-018-0141-4

Representative Publications Paxton, A., & Dale, R. (2013). Argument disrupts interpersonal synchrony. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66(11), 2092-2102.

 

Paxton, A., & Dale, R. (2017). Interpersonal movement coordination responds to high- and low-level conversational constraints. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1135.

 

Main, A., Paxton, A., & Dale, R. (2016). An exploratory analysis of dynamic emotion regulation between mothers and adolescents during conflict discussions. Emotion, 16(6), 913-928.

 

Paxton, A., & Griffiths, T. L. (2017). Finding the traces of behavior and cognition in big data and naturally occurring datasets. Behavior Research Methods, 49(5), 1630-1638.

Professional Activities
  • Academic editor, PLOS ONE
  • Consulting editor, Behavior Research Methods
  • President-elect, Society for Computers in Psychology